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A word in CAPITALS is defined in the e-government services ontology; a word in BOLD CAPITALS was already defined in the Enterprise ontology; a word with an Initial capital is a meta term; a word in italics is a fundamental concept that needs no definition

Knowledge management applied to e-government services: the use of an ontology

KMGov, (2003): 116-126

Cited: 67|Views32
EI

Abstract

This paper is about the development and use of an ontology of e-government services. We identify the knowledge required to deliver e-government transaction services. Based on the SmartGov project, we describe the use of a domain map to assist in knowledge management and motivate the use of an ontology as a domain map. We describe the deve...More

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Introduction
  • Delivery of complete e-government services requires public authorities to be able to: œ publish information that customers can use œ gather information through usable forms œ react online to specific requests from customers œ manage the online exchange of items of high-value œ integrate services as much as possible

    A large amount and wide range of knowledge is required to achieve this.
  • This paper examines how such knowledge can be managed for the benefit of all the roles in the previous paragraph and, customers.
  • It is based on work done during the SmartGov project, the main deliverable of which is to be a knowledgebased software platform for design and delivery of e-government services.
  • In particular the authors explain how a domain map and knowledge units are used
Highlights
  • Delivery of complete e-government services requires public authorities to be able to: œ publish information that customers can use œ gather information through usable forms œ react online to specific requests from customers œ manage the online exchange of items of high-value œ integrate services as much as possible

    A large amount and wide range of knowledge is required to achieve this
  • The knowledge is applied by managers, service designers and those who operate and support the services, including information technology (IT) specialists
  • This paper examines how such knowledge can be managed for the benefit of all the roles in the previous paragraph and, customers
  • It is based on work done during the SmartGov project, the main deliverable of which is to be a knowledgebased software platform for design and delivery of e-government services
  • A full list is available in the Results section of the SmartGov project web site
  • A word in CAPITALS is defined in the e-government services ontology; a word in BOLD CAPITALS was already defined in the Enterprise ontology; a word with an Initial capital is a meta term; a word in italics is a fundamental concept that needs no definition
Results
  • Are some of the definitions from the ontology. A full list is available in the Results section of the SmartGov project web site (http://www.smartgov-project.org).

    In the definitions below, a word in CAPITALS is defined in the e-government services ontology; a word in BOLD CAPITALS was already defined in the Enterprise ontology; a word with an Initial capital is a meta term; a word in italics is a fundamental concept that needs no definition.

    The accompanying diagrams, which the authors produced using the KAON OIModeler, are visual representations of relevant parts of the ontology.
  • Are some of the definitions from the ontology.
  • A full list is available in the Results section of the SmartGov project web site.
  • A word in CAPITALS is defined in the e-government services ontology; a word in BOLD CAPITALS was already defined in the Enterprise ontology; a word with an Initial capital is a meta term; a word in italics is a fundamental concept that needs no definition.
  • The authors do not describe them in detail here: they are included to give a sense of the complexity of the ontology.
Conclusion
  • Using the Enterprise Ontology as a starting point proved invaluable. The authors did not need to reinvent the wheel and it set the style of the mode of thinking required to develop the e-government service ontology.

    The authors are in little doubt that the existence of an ontology helps understanding, sharing and the process of building models.
  • The project has developed new ways of automating the construction and maintenance of their taxonomies.The main benefits from the use of the SmartGov e-government ontology are: œ The ontology supports communication by providing a shared vocabulary with welldefined meaning, avoiding ambiguities and misunderstandings.
  • It can support communication between human agents and software agents.
  • In the case of SmartGov it allows different aspects of the domain — knowledge units and transaction service components — to be interrelated to best advantage
Funding
  • SmartGov (IST-2001-35399) is supported by the European Commission under the Information Society Technologies 5th Framework Programme (Key Action Line: On-line support for democratic processes). We used the software tool OIModeler, which is part of KAON (The Karlsruhe Ontology and Semantic Web Framework), an open-source ontology management infrastructure developed by Forschungszentrum Informatik (FZI) and the Institut für Angewandte Informatik und Formale Beschreibungsverfahren (AIFB), Universität Karlsruhe
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