AI helps you reading Science

AI generates interpretation videos

AI extracts and analyses the key points of the paper to generate videos automatically


pub
Go Generating

AI Traceability

AI parses the academic lineage of this thesis


Master Reading Tree
Generate MRT

AI Insight

AI extracts a summary of this paper


Weibo:
In order to provide an efficient and effective method for studying the various emotional, cognitive, structural, and process components present in individuals’ verbal and written speech samples, we developed a text analysis application called Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count, or...

Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count 2001

(2001)

Cited: 55|Views2104
Full Text
Bibtex
Weibo

Code:

Data:

Introduction
  • Some of the authors of this publication are working on these related projects: Measurement and psychosocial factors of well being View project DE-LIWC2015: The German Version of the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) 2015 Dictionary View project.
  • LIWC2001 includes the ability for limited contextual analysis by allowing you to specify conditional category selection for particular dictionary words in two ways.
  • In order to provide an efficient and effective method for studying the various emotional, cognitive, structural, and process components present in individuals’ verbal and written speech samples, the authors developed a text analysis application called Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count, or LIWC.
Highlights
  • Some of the authors of this publication are working on these related projects: Measurement and psychosocial factors of well being View project DE-LIWC2015: The German Version of the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) 2015 Dictionary View project
  • Not designed for spoken language, we have found LIWC2001 to be useful in analyzing conversations and interviews
  • In order to provide an efficient and effective method for studying the various emotional, cognitive, structural, and process components present in individuals’ verbal and written speech samples, we developed a text analysis application called Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count, or Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count
  • The LIWC2001 Dictionary includes the stem “hungr*” which allows for any target word that matches the first five letters to be counted as an eating word
  • Text files from several dozen studies, totaling over 8 million words were analyzed using the 1997 version of Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count as well as WordSmith, a powerful word count program used in discourse analysis
  • Note that except for total word count and words per sentence, all means in Table 3 are expressed as percentage of total word use in any given speech/text sample
Results
  • LIWC2001 applications are designed to analyze written text on a word by word basis, calculate the percentage words in the text that match each of up to 82 language dimensions, and generate output as a tab-delimited text file that can be directly read into application programs, such as SPSS for Windows, Excel, etc.
  • The LIWC2001 application contains within it a default set of word categories and a default dictionary that defines which words should be counted in the target text files.
  • LIWC2001 is designed to accept written or transcribed verbal text which has been stored as a text or ASCII file using any of the popular word processing software packages (e.g., WordPerfect or Word).
  • LIWC2001 reads each designated text file, one target word at a time.
  • The LIWC2001 Dictionary includes the stem “hungr*” which allows for any target word that matches the first five letters to be counted as an eating word.
  • Each of the 74 default LIWC2001 categories is composed of a list of dictionary words that define that scale.
  • Table 1 provides a comprehensive list of the default LIWC2001 dictionary categories, scales, sample scale words, and relevant scale word counts.
  • Text files from several dozen studies, totaling over 8 million words were analyzed using the 1997 version of LIWC as well as WordSmith, a powerful word count program used in discourse analysis.
Conclusion
  • Once the entire new LIWC dictionary was assembled, any words that were not used at least 0.005 percent of the time in the previous text files or were not listed in Francis and Kucera’s (1982) Frequency Analysis of English Usage were excluded.
  • After the writing phase of the study was completed, four judges rated the participants’ essays on various emotional, cognitive, content, and composition dimensions designed to correspond to selected LIWC Dictionary scales.
  • Note that except for total word count and words per sentence, all means in Table 3 are expressed as percentage of total word use in any given speech/text sample.
Tables
  • Table1: LIWC2001 Output Variable Information
  • Table2: Summary Information for LIWC2001 Statistics
  • Table3: LIWC2001 Means Across 43 Studies
Download tables as Excel
Reference
  • Francis, W.N., & Kucera, H. (1982). Frequency analyses of English usage: Lexicon and grammar. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Gottschalk, L.A., & Gleser, G.C. (1969). The measurement of psychological states through the content analysis of verbal behavior. Berkeley: University of California Press.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Pennebaker, J. W. (1997). Writing about emotional experiences as a therapeutic process. Psychological Science, 8, 162-166.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Pennebaker, J.W., & Francis, M.E. (1996). Cognitive, emotional, and language processes in disclosure. Cognition and Emotion, 10, 601-626.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Pennebaker, J.W., & King, L.A. (1999). Linguistic styles: Language use as an individual difference. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 77, 1296-1312.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Pennebaker, J. W., Mayne, T., & Francis, M. E. (1997). Linguistic predictors of adaptive bereavement. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72, 863-871.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Rosenberg, S.D. & Tucker, G.J. (1978). Verbal behavior and schizophrenia: The semantic dimension. Archives of General Psychiatry, 36, 1331-1337.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Stiles, W.B. (1992). Describing talk: A taxonomy of verbal response modes. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Watson, D., Clark, L.A., & Tellegen, A. (1988). Development and validation of brief measures of positive and negative affect: The PANAS scales. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 1063-1070.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
0
Your rating :

No Ratings

Tags
Comments
数据免责声明
页面数据均来自互联网公开来源、合作出版商和通过AI技术自动分析结果,我们不对页面数据的有效性、准确性、正确性、可靠性、完整性和及时性做出任何承诺和保证。若有疑问,可以通过电子邮件方式联系我们:report@aminer.cn