AI帮你理解科学

AI 生成解读视频

AI抽取解析论文重点内容自动生成视频


pub
生成解读视频

AI 溯源

AI解析本论文相关学术脉络


Master Reading Tree
生成 溯源树

AI 精读

AI抽取本论文的概要总结


微博一下
Au NWs on the substrate were incubated with a target DNAs and subsequently immersed into a solution of Au NPs attached with the reporter DNAs to construct Au particleon-wire structure through the sandwich hybridization of probe-target-reporter DNAs

Patterned multiplex pathogen DNA detection by Au particle-on-wire SERS sensor.

NANO LETTERS, no. 4 (2010): 1189-1193

被引用282|浏览7
WOS
下载 PDF 全文
引用
微博一下

摘要

A Au particle-on-wire system that can be used as a specific, sensitive, and multiplex DNA sensor is developed. A pattern formed by multiple Au nanowire sensors provides positional address and identification for each sensor. By using this system, multiplex sensing of target DNAs was possible in a quantitative manner with a detection limit ...更多

代码

数据

0
简介
  • Sensitive, and specific DNA detection is of great demand for various biological and biomedical studies including gene profiling, drug screening, and clinical diagnostics because it has a potential to provide the most information from a small sample volume at low cost.[1].
  • The authors present a multiplex DNA detection method employing multiple Au particle-on-wire systems as a SERS sensing platform.
  • Received for review: 10/19/2009 Published on Web: 03/11/2010 providing reproducible SERS signals in proportion to the concentrations of target DNAs. Multiple pathogen DNAs could be successfully detected by employing this method, demonstrating that this multiplex SERS sensor can be used a convenient system for clinical diagnostic and biomolecular interaction studies.
重点内容
  • Multiplex, sensitive, and specific DNA detection is of great demand for various biological and biomedical studies including gene profiling, drug screening, and clinical diagnostics because it has a potential to provide the most information from a small sample volume at low cost.[1]
  • The system operates by the self-assembly of Au NPs onto Au NW in the presence of target DNAs
  • Au NWs on the substrate were incubated with a target DNAs and subsequently immersed into a solution of Au NPs attached with the reporter DNAs to construct Au particleon-wire structure through the sandwich hybridization of probe-target-reporter DNAs
  • Strong Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signal from Cy5 is observed only when the complementary target DNAs were added as seen in Figure 1b, indicating high specificity to DNA sequences
  • The Au particle-on-wire sensors unambiguously identified the correct pathogen DNAs in each sample. These results demonstrate that the particle-on-wire sensor system developed here can be used for multiplex pathogen diagnostics
  • The target DNAs extracted from various clinical specimens including cerebrospinal fluid, stool, pus, and sputum (Supporting Information) were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and detected by SERS sensor developed in this study
结果
  • The detection limit of the Au particle-on-wire sensor system was determined by observing the 1580 cm-1 band intensity of Cy5 as the concentration of target DNAs is changed (Figure 2a).
  • To confirm multiplex DNA detection by the Au particleon-wire system, two Au NWs that were modified with different probe DNAs (Efm[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20] and Sau[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Supporting Information Table S1) were employed.
  • The sensing platform was fabricated by four Au NWs, each attached with four different probe DNAs (Efm[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Sau[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Smal[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], and Vvul0220, Supporting Information Table S1), respectively, placed on a single substrate.
  • The NW alignment and integration on the substrate are key steps toward fabrication of the practical biosensor chip that can realize a NW based sensor for multiplex detection of biomolecules.[42] In this experiment, the authors used a custom-built nanomanipulator for patterning of different probe DNA attached Au NWs (Supporting Information Figure S1).
  • The orientations of individual NWs provide positional addresses for each NW (Figure 4b), identifying the pathogen DNA that the particle-on-wire sensor has detected.
  • (c) SERS intensities of 1580 cm-1 band measured on each particle-on-wire sensor with a sample containing only one kind of target DNA of a concentration of 10-8 M.
  • From the addressable positions of the particle-on-wire sensor, the authors could identify the NWs and detect multiple target DNAs in a single assay.
  • The SERS spectra from each of the four particle-on-wire system when the sample included two target DNAs (E.
结论
  • Faecium DNA was present in the sample, SERS signal was detected only at the blue-tagged sensor.
  • The target DNAs extracted from various clinical specimens including cerebrospinal fluid, stool, pus, and sputum (Supporting Information) were amplified by PCR and detected by SERS sensor developed in this study.
  • The particle-on-wire sensor provides reproducible SERS signals only in the presence of target DNAs in proportion to the DNA concentration spanning from 10 pM to 10 nM.
总结
  • Sensitive, and specific DNA detection is of great demand for various biological and biomedical studies including gene profiling, drug screening, and clinical diagnostics because it has a potential to provide the most information from a small sample volume at low cost.[1].
  • The authors present a multiplex DNA detection method employing multiple Au particle-on-wire systems as a SERS sensing platform.
  • Received for review: 10/19/2009 Published on Web: 03/11/2010 providing reproducible SERS signals in proportion to the concentrations of target DNAs. Multiple pathogen DNAs could be successfully detected by employing this method, demonstrating that this multiplex SERS sensor can be used a convenient system for clinical diagnostic and biomolecular interaction studies.
  • The detection limit of the Au particle-on-wire sensor system was determined by observing the 1580 cm-1 band intensity of Cy5 as the concentration of target DNAs is changed (Figure 2a).
  • To confirm multiplex DNA detection by the Au particleon-wire system, two Au NWs that were modified with different probe DNAs (Efm[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20] and Sau[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Supporting Information Table S1) were employed.
  • The sensing platform was fabricated by four Au NWs, each attached with four different probe DNAs (Efm[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Sau[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], Smal[3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20], and Vvul0220, Supporting Information Table S1), respectively, placed on a single substrate.
  • The NW alignment and integration on the substrate are key steps toward fabrication of the practical biosensor chip that can realize a NW based sensor for multiplex detection of biomolecules.[42] In this experiment, the authors used a custom-built nanomanipulator for patterning of different probe DNA attached Au NWs (Supporting Information Figure S1).
  • The orientations of individual NWs provide positional addresses for each NW (Figure 4b), identifying the pathogen DNA that the particle-on-wire sensor has detected.
  • (c) SERS intensities of 1580 cm-1 band measured on each particle-on-wire sensor with a sample containing only one kind of target DNA of a concentration of 10-8 M.
  • From the addressable positions of the particle-on-wire sensor, the authors could identify the NWs and detect multiple target DNAs in a single assay.
  • The SERS spectra from each of the four particle-on-wire system when the sample included two target DNAs (E.
  • Faecium DNA was present in the sample, SERS signal was detected only at the blue-tagged sensor.
  • The target DNAs extracted from various clinical specimens including cerebrospinal fluid, stool, pus, and sputum (Supporting Information) were amplified by PCR and detected by SERS sensor developed in this study.
  • The particle-on-wire sensor provides reproducible SERS signals only in the presence of target DNAs in proportion to the DNA concentration spanning from 10 pM to 10 nM.
基金
  • The work of B.K. was supported by NRF through NRL (20090083138), Nano R&D program (20090083221), SRC (2010-0001484), and a grant from “Center for Nanostructured Materials Technology” under “21C Frontier R&D Programs” (2009K000468), of the MEST
  • The work of S.Y.L. was supported by the IT Leading R&D Project from the Ministry of Knowledge Economy through IITA, World Class University Program of MEST, and by LG Chem Chair Professorship. Supporting Information Available
研究对象与分析
reference pathogenic strains: 4
The above experiments clearly demonstrate that quantitative detection of target DNAs is possible by the particleon-wire system. To evaluate practical applicability, the system was employed for pathogen diagnosis using the target DNAs prepared by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the genomic DNAs extracted from four reference pathogenic strains (Supporting Information). Enterococcus faecium and Staphylococcus aureus are the most prevalent pathogens in bloodstream infections with high morbidity and mortality.[39]

引用论文
  • AND NOTES (1) Li, Y.; Cu, Y. T. H.; Luo, D. Nat. Biotechnol. 2005, 23, 885–889.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (2) Nicewarner-Pena, S. R.; Freeman, R. G.; Reiss, B. D.; He, L.; Pena, D. J.; Walton, I. D.; Cromer, R.; Keating, C. D.; Natan, M. J. Science 2001, 294, 137–141.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (3) Stoermer, R. L.; Cederquist, K. B.; McFarland, S. K.; Sha, M. Y.; Penn, S. G.; Keating, C. D. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 16892– 16903.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (4) Nelson, B. P.; Grimsrud, T. E.; Liles, M. R.; Goodman, R. M.; Corn, R. M. Anal. Chem. 2001, 73, 1–7.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (5) Basuray, S.; Senapati, S.; Aijian, A.; Mahon, A. R.; Chang, H.-C. ACS Nano 2009, 3, 1823–1830.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (6) Ross, P.; Hall, L.; Smirnov, I.; Haff, L. Nat. Biotechnol. 1998, 16, 1347–1351.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (7) Mahajan, S.; Richardson, J.; Brown, T.; Bartlett, P. N. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2008, 130, 15589–15601.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (8) Nie, S.; Emory, S. R. Science 1997, 275, 1102–1106.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (9) Kneipp, K.; Kneipp, H.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R. R.; Feld, M. S. Chem.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Rev. 1999, 99, 2957–2976.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (10) Kneipp, K.; Kneipp, H.; Kneipp, J. Acc. Chem. Res. 2006, 39, 443–450.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (11) Huang, W.; Qian, W.; Jain, P. K.; El-Sayed, M. A. Nano Lett. 2007, 7, 3227–3234.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (12) Braun, G.; Lee, S. J.; Dante, M.; Nguyen, T.-Q.; Moskovits, M.; Reich, N. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 6378–6379.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (13) Cao, Y. C.; Jin, R.; Mirkin, C. A. Science 2002, 297, 1536–1540.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (14) Faulds, K.; Smith, W. E.; Graham, D. Anal. Chem. 2004, 76, 412–417.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (15) Qin, L.; Banholzer, M. J.; Millstone, J. E.; Mirkin, C. A. Nano Lett.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • 2007, 7, 3849–3853.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (16) Sun, L.; Yu, C.; Irudayaraj, J. Anal. Chem. 2007, 79, 3981–3988.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (17) Gunawidjaja, R.; Peleshanko, S.; Ko, H.; Tsukruk, V. V. Adv. Mater.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • 2008, 20, 1544–1549.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (18) Ko, H.; Singamaneni, S.; Tsukruk, V. V. Small 2008, 4, 1576–1599.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (19) Wei, H.; Hao, F.; Huang, Y.; Wang, W.; Nordlander; Xu, H. Nano
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Lett 2008, 8, 2497–2502.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (20) Lee, S. J.; Baik, J. M.; Moskovits, M. Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 3244–3247.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (21) Hutchison, J. A.; Centeno, S. P.; Odaka, H.; Fukumura, H.; Hofkens, J.; Uji-I, H. Nano Lett 2009, 9, 995–1001.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (22) Fang, Y.; Wei, H.; Hao, F.; Nordlander, P.; Xu, H. Nano Lett. 2009, 9, 2049–2053.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (23) Kang, T.; Yoon, I.; Kim, J.; Ihee, H.; Kim, B. Chem.sEur. J. 2010, 16, 1351–1355.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (24) Moskovits, M. Rev. Mod. Phys. 1985, 57, 783–828.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (25) Xu, H.; Bjerneld, E. J.; Kall, M.; Borjesson, L. Phys. Rev. Lett. 1999, 83, 4357–4360.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (26) Xu, H.; Aizpurua, J.; Kall, M.; Apell, P. Phy. Rev. E 2000, 62, 4318–4324.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (27) Xu, H.; Kall, M. ChemPhysChem 2003, 4, 1001–1005.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (28) Graham, D.; Thompson, D. G.; Smith, W. E.; Faulds, K. Nat.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Nanotechnol. 2008, 3, 548–551.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (29) Cho, H.; Baker, B. R.; Wachsmann-Hogiu, S.; Pagba, C. V.; Laurence, T. A.; Lane, S. M.; Lee, L. P.; Tok, J. B.-H. Nano Lett 2008, 8, 4386–4390.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (30) Talley, C. E.; Jackson, J. B.; Oubre, C.; Grady, N. K.; Hollars, C. W.; Lane, S. M.; Huser, T. R.; Nordlander, P.; Halas, N. J. Nano Lett. 2005, 5, 1569–1574.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (31) Murphy, C. J.; Sau, T. K.; Gole, A. M.; Orendorff, C. J.; Gao, J.; Gou, L.; Hunyadi, S. E.; Li, T. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 13857–13870.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (32) Lee, S. J.; Morrill, A. R.; Moskovits, M. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2006, 128, 2200–2201.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (33) Mohanty, P.; Yoon, I.; Kang, T.; Seo, K.; Varadwaj, K. S. K.; Choi, W.; Park, Q. sH.; Ahn, J. P.; Suh, Y. D.; Ihee, H.; Kim, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2007, 129, 9576–9577.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (34) Yoon, I.; Kang, T.; Choi, W.; Kim, J.; Yoo, Y.; Joo, S. sW.; Park, Q. sH.; Ihee, H.; Kim, B. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 758–762.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (35) Kang, T.; Yoon, I.; Jeon, K. sS.; Choi, W.; Lee, Y.; Seo, K.; Yoo, Y.; Park, Q. sH.; Ihee, Y.; Suh, Y. D.; Kim, B. J. Phys. Chem. C 2009, 113, 7492–7496.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • (36) Hurst, S. J.; Lytton-Jean, A. K. R.; Mirkin, C. A. Anal. Chem. 2006, 78, 8313–8318.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (37) Lan, S.; Veiseh, M.; Zhang, M. Biosens. Bioelect. 2005, 20, 1697– 1708.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (38) McFarland, A. D.; Young, M. A.; Dieringer, J. A.; Van Duyne, R. P. J. Phys. Chem. B 2005, 109, 11279–11285.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (39) Wisplinghoff, H.; Bischoff, T.; Tallent, S. M.; Seifert, H.; Wenzel, R. P.; Edmond, M. B. Clin. Infect. Dis. 2004, 39, 309–317.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (40) Whitby, P. W.; Carter, K. B.; Burns, J. L.; Royall, J. A.; LiPuma, J. J.; Stull, T. L. J. Clin. Microbiol. 2000, 38, 4305–4309.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • (41) Gerhard, G. S.; Levin, K. A.; Price, G. J.; Wojnar, M. M.; Chorney, M. J.; Belchis, D. A. Arch. Pathol. Lab. Med. 2001, 125, 1107–1109.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
您的评分 :
0

 

标签
评论
小科