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The use of the travelling wave ion guide in the collision cell of a tandem quadrupole instrument was shown to be effective at minimising crosstalk between multiple-reaction monitoring channels to $0.01% when operating at short acquisition times as well as maintaining sensitivity

Applications of a travelling wave-based radio-frequency-only stacked ring ion guide.

RAPID COMMUNICATIONS IN MASS SPECTROMETRY, no. 20 (2004): 2401-2414

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摘要

The use of radio-frequency (RF)-only ion guides for efficient transport of ions through regions of a mass spectrometer where the background gas pressure is relatively high is widespread in present instrumentation. Whilst multiple collisions between ions and the background gas can be beneficial, for example in inducing fragmentation and/or...更多

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简介
  • The use of radio-frequency (RF)-only ion guides for efficient transport of ions through regions of a mass spectrometer where the background gas pressure is relatively high is widespread in present instrumentation.
  • Whilst the cooling of ions within RF-only ion guides through collisions with neutral gas can be beneficial in terms of conditioning the beam for mass analysis, the reduction in kinetic energy, in the axial direction, leads to significant ion transit times through the device
  • This can be problematic for certain modes of mass analysis where fast mass scanning/switching are required.
  • Other groups have reported the effective use of axial fields to move ions through gas-filled RF-only ion guides.[20,21,22,23,24,25]
重点内容
  • The use of radio-frequency (RF)-only ion guides for efficient transport of ions through regions of a mass spectrometer where the background gas pressure is relatively high is widespread in present instrumentation
  • The ion guides employed in analytical instruments are generally quadrupole, hexapole or octapole devices and have found particular utility in regions where the neutral gas pressure is sufficiently high (10À3 to 10À2 mbar) that multiple collisions take place with the gas, such as in collision cells[2] and in intermediate chambers between atmospheric pressure ion sources and the mass analyser.[3,4]
  • Coated electrodes were placed around the stacked ring ion guide (SRIG) and, at the required time, a potential difference was placed across the electrodes, imparting an axial field along the SRIG by field penetration between the ring electrodes
  • Various approaches to provide an axial field along an RF ion guide were investigated by Thomson et al.[19] in the quadrupole-based collision cell of a tandem mass spectrometer and were shown to be effective at reducing ion transit time whilst maintaining transmission efficiency
  • The combination of a SRIG with a travelling voltage wave superimposed on the confining RF voltage has been shown to be very effective at transporting ions at gas pressures over the range of 10À3 to 10À1 mbar
  • The use of the travelling wave ion guide (TWIG) in the collision cell of a tandem quadrupole instrument was shown to be effective at minimising crosstalk between multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) channels to $0.01% when operating at short (10 ms) acquisition times as well as maintaining sensitivity
结果
  • Proof of principle

    The physical operation of the device may be clearly demonstrated by varying the travelling wave velocity and observing its effect on the mass spectral peak shape of a product ion.
  • The higher intensity observed in (b) is due to this bunching effect where the same total number of ions as in (a) are confined between fewer wave pulses
结论
  • The beneficial effects of multiple collisions between an ion and a neutral gas on transit through an RF-only ion guide are well known.
  • The appropriate choices of travelling wave velocity, pulse height and neutral gas pressure have enabled use of the TWIG in various application areas, including as a collision cell in a tandem mass spectrometer where fast mass scanning or switching are used, as an ion mobility separator, as an ion delivery device to improve the duty cycle of an oa-TOF analyser, and as an ion fragmentation device.
  • For optimum results at the 3 Â 10À3 mbar used in the collision cell, travelling wave pulse heights of 2–5 V and a wave velocity of 300 m/s were found to be appropriate
总结
  • Introduction:

    The use of radio-frequency (RF)-only ion guides for efficient transport of ions through regions of a mass spectrometer where the background gas pressure is relatively high is widespread in present instrumentation.
  • Whilst the cooling of ions within RF-only ion guides through collisions with neutral gas can be beneficial in terms of conditioning the beam for mass analysis, the reduction in kinetic energy, in the axial direction, leads to significant ion transit times through the device
  • This can be problematic for certain modes of mass analysis where fast mass scanning/switching are required.
  • Other groups have reported the effective use of axial fields to move ions through gas-filled RF-only ion guides.[20,21,22,23,24,25]
  • Results:

    Proof of principle

    The physical operation of the device may be clearly demonstrated by varying the travelling wave velocity and observing its effect on the mass spectral peak shape of a product ion.
  • The higher intensity observed in (b) is due to this bunching effect where the same total number of ions as in (a) are confined between fewer wave pulses
  • Conclusion:

    The beneficial effects of multiple collisions between an ion and a neutral gas on transit through an RF-only ion guide are well known.
  • The appropriate choices of travelling wave velocity, pulse height and neutral gas pressure have enabled use of the TWIG in various application areas, including as a collision cell in a tandem mass spectrometer where fast mass scanning or switching are used, as an ion mobility separator, as an ion delivery device to improve the duty cycle of an oa-TOF analyser, and as an ion fragmentation device.
  • For optimum results at the 3 Â 10À3 mbar used in the collision cell, travelling wave pulse heights of 2–5 V and a wave velocity of 300 m/s were found to be appropriate
基金
  • At a TWIG pressure of 6 Â 10À2 mbar, optimum fragmentation occurred with a pulse height of 8 V and a wave velocity of 540 m/s; whilst transmission was up to 50% of that obtained from standard CID, the fragmentation pattern was biased to lower m/z ions
研究对象与分析
pairs with interconnections made on the supporting PCBs: 7
To generate the travelling wave three voltages are supplied to each ring electrode: the radially confining RF voltage, the travelling wave voltage, and a DC bias for fragmentation of ions if required. The electrodes in the cell are divided into repeat sections of seven pairs with interconnections made on the supporting PCBs, such that pairs 1,8,15. . ., and 2,9,16. and so on would have the same applied pulse

electrode pairs: 4
Regions are provided at the entrance and exit of the TWIG in which electrodes have only the RF applied and no travelling wave pulse. These ‘passive’ regions were produced by connecting the first and last four electrode pairs to a supply without the travelling wave voltage, and improved transmission ($10–20%) and reduced the energy spread of the exiting ions. With the passive regions in place, a total of seven or eight travelling wave pulses are present along the cell at any one time

electrode pairs: 3
An investigation was undertaken to establish the temporal intensity profile of ion packets being delivered from the TWIG to the pusher region. To do this, a timing sequence was set up such that the exit plate of the TWIG was held at þ5 V relative to the ring electrodes until a travelling wave pulse (þ5 V) was three electrode pairs from it, then the voltage was dropped to À5 V. The subsequent delay until the pusher energised was 9 ms, and this was increased by 0.5 ms every 20 s to provide the temporal intensity profile

electrode pairs: 3
Mass spectral data obtained from the labelled mobility peaks in Fig. 20 illustrating the presence of bradykinin multimer ions at m/z 1061. Arrival time profile of m/z 152.1 at the pusher following release from the TWIG when the travelling wave pulse was three electrode pairs from the exit plate. TOF acquisition of the product ions of glufibrinopeptide B (m/z 785.6): (a) with the pusher running asynchronously and no travelling wave and (b) with the pusher running synchronously with the travelling wave

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