AI帮你理解科学

AI 生成解读视频

AI抽取解析论文重点内容自动生成视频


pub
生成解读视频

AI 溯源

AI解析本论文相关学术脉络


Master Reading Tree
生成 溯源树

AI 精读

AI抽取本论文的概要总结


微博一下
The complexity of the proposed model was such that a heuristic solution procedure was the only viable approach to solve very large problems

The design of reverse distribution networks: Models and solution procedures

European Journal of Operational Research, no. 1 (2003): 128-149

被引用631|浏览10
EI
下载 PDF 全文
引用
微博一下

摘要

Reverse distribution, or the management of product return flows, induced by various forms of reuse of products and materials, has received growing attention throughout this decade. In this paper we discuss reverse distribution, and propose a mathematical programming model for a version of this problem. Due to the complexity of the propose...更多

代码

数据

0
简介
  • Reverse logistics encompasses the logistics activities all the way from used products no longer required by the user to products again usable in the market
  • It is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient, cost effective flow of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods and related information from the point of consumption to the point of origin for the purpose of recapturing value or proper disposal (Stock, 1998).
  • Reverse distribution activities involve the removal of defective and environmentally hazardous products from the hands of customers
  • This includes products that have reached the end of their usable life.
  • It is a process whereby companies can become more environmentally efficient through reusing and reducing the amount of materials used
重点内容
  • Reverse logistics encompasses the logistics activities all the way from used products no longer required by the user to products again usable in the market
  • In this paper we proposed models and solution procedures for a reverse distribution problem
  • The complexity of the proposed model was such that a heuristic solution procedure was the only viable approach to solve very large problems
  • We proposed heuristic concentration procedures combined with heuristic expansion (HE) to solve this problem
  • The proposed solution approach can be adapted to other hierarchical facility location and distribution problems, such as the forward logistical flow faced by a retail chain doing inbound consolidation where products flow from many vendors to inbound consolidation centers, and from there to plants or distribution centers
方法
  • Procedure SolveRefurb Random selection

    Set MaxIterations 1⁄4 b

    1. While Iterations < MaxIterations do: 2.
  • 1. While Iterations < MaxIterations do: 2.
  • Select a subset of size Pmax from the collection sites, and Qmax from the destination sites.
  • 3. Append the AMPL model file in such a manner that only the sites selected in step 2 are considered as potential facility sites.
  • 4. Solve the current problem to optimality using AMPL.
  • If the current solution is better than the best previously found solution, update best-found solution
结果
  • The owner of Arm and Hammer, estimates that the loyalty of customers who appreciate the companyÕs clean-and-green image translates into 5–15% more revenues per year (Ottoman, 1998).
  • Problem instance 5 of problem set 1 is truly an outlier, with optimality gap of more than 23% for the HE with the HC-100 random selection method
结论
  • In this paper the authors proposed models and solution procedures for a reverse distribution problem.
  • The complexity of the proposed model was such that a heuristic solution procedure was the only viable approach to solve very large problems.
  • The proposed solution approach can be adapted to other hierarchical facility location and distribution problems, such as the forward logistical flow faced by a retail chain doing inbound consolidation where products flow from many vendors to inbound consolidation centers, and from there to plants or distribution centers
总结
  • Introduction:

    Reverse logistics encompasses the logistics activities all the way from used products no longer required by the user to products again usable in the market
  • It is the process of planning, implementing, and controlling the efficient, cost effective flow of raw materials, in-process inventory, finished goods and related information from the point of consumption to the point of origin for the purpose of recapturing value or proper disposal (Stock, 1998).
  • Reverse distribution activities involve the removal of defective and environmentally hazardous products from the hands of customers
  • This includes products that have reached the end of their usable life.
  • It is a process whereby companies can become more environmentally efficient through reusing and reducing the amount of materials used
  • Methods:

    Procedure SolveRefurb Random selection

    Set MaxIterations 1⁄4 b

    1. While Iterations < MaxIterations do: 2.
  • 1. While Iterations < MaxIterations do: 2.
  • Select a subset of size Pmax from the collection sites, and Qmax from the destination sites.
  • 3. Append the AMPL model file in such a manner that only the sites selected in step 2 are considered as potential facility sites.
  • 4. Solve the current problem to optimality using AMPL.
  • If the current solution is better than the best previously found solution, update best-found solution
  • Results:

    The owner of Arm and Hammer, estimates that the loyalty of customers who appreciate the companyÕs clean-and-green image translates into 5–15% more revenues per year (Ottoman, 1998).
  • Problem instance 5 of problem set 1 is truly an outlier, with optimality gap of more than 23% for the HE with the HC-100 random selection method
  • Conclusion:

    In this paper the authors proposed models and solution procedures for a reverse distribution problem.
  • The complexity of the proposed model was such that a heuristic solution procedure was the only viable approach to solve very large problems.
  • The proposed solution approach can be adapted to other hierarchical facility location and distribution problems, such as the forward logistical flow faced by a retail chain doing inbound consolidation where products flow from many vendors to inbound consolidation centers, and from there to plants or distribution centers
表格
  • Table1: Computational results
  • Table2: Computational time
  • Table3: Summary of average optimality gaps
  • Table4: Analysis of optimal solution performance
Download tables as Excel
基金
  • Inc, the owner of Arm and Hammer, estimates that the loyalty of customers who appreciate the companyÕs clean-and-green image translates into 5–15% more revenues per year (or about $75 million) (Ottoman, 1998)
  • Problem instance 5 of problem set 1 is truly an outlier, with optimality gap of more than 23% for the HE with the HC-100 random selection method
引用论文
  • Ballou, R., 1992. Business Logistics Management. Prentice-Hall Publications, Englewood Cliffs, NJ.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Barcelo, J., Casanovas, J., 1984. A heuristic Lagrangian algorithm for the capacitated plant location problem. European Journal of Operational Research 15, 212–226.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Barros, A.I., Dekker, R., Scholten, V., 1998. A two-level network for recycling sand: A case study. European Journal of Operational Research 110, 199–214.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Beckman, S., Worhach, P., Sheng, P.S., 1995. Environmentally conscious supply chain management. Proceedings of the 1995 IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment, Orlando, FL, pp. 235–239.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M., Salomon, M., van Wassenhove, L.N., 1994. On the coordination of product and by-product flows in two-level distribution networks: Model formulations and solution procedures. European Journal of Operational Research 79, 325–339.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M., Van Beek, P., Hordijk, L., van Wassenhove, L.N., 1995. Interactions between operations research and environmental management. European Journal of Operational Research 85, 229–243.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M., Fleischmann, M., van Nunen, J., 1999. Reviewing distribution issues in reverse logistics. In: Speranza, M.G., Stahly, P. (Eds.), New Trends in Distribution Logistics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 23–44.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Carter, C., Ellram, L., 199Reverse logistics: A review of the literature and framework for future investigation. Journal of Business Logistics 19, 85–102.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Caruso, C., Colorni, A., Paruccini, M., 1993. The regional urban solid waste management system: A modeling approach. European Journal of Operational Research 70, 16– 30.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Chandran, R., Lancioni, R.A., 1981. Product recall: A challenge for the 1980Õs. International Journal of Physical Distribution and Materials Management 11 (8), 46–55.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Clemons, E.K., Reddi, S.P., Row, M.C., 1993. The impact of information technology on the organization of economic activity: The ‘‘move to the middle’’ hypothesis. Journal of Management Information Systems 10 (2), 9–35.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Davis, P.S., Ray, T.L., 1969. A branch-and-bound algorithm for the capacitated facilities location problem. Naval Research Logistics 16, 331–344.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Fisk, G., Chandran, R., 1975. How to trace and recall products. Harvard Business Review, 90–96.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Fleischmann, M., Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M., Dekker, R., van der Laan, E., van Nunen, J.A.E.E., van Wassenhove, L.N., 1997. Quantitative models for reverse logistics: A review. European Journal of Operational Research 103, 1–17.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Fleischmann, M., Krikke, H.R., Dekker, R., Flapper, S.D.P., 2000a. A characterisation of logistics networks for product recovery. Omega 28 (6), 653–666.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Fleischmann, M., Beullens, P., Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M., van Wassenhove, L.N., 2000b. The impact of product recovery on logistics network design. INSEAD working paper 2000/ 33/TM/CIMSO.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Fourer, R., Gay, D.M., Kernighan, B.W., 1995. AMPL: A Modeling Language for Mathematical Programming. The Scientific Press, San Francisco, CA.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Geoffrion, A.M., Graves, G.W., 1974. Multicommodity distribution system design by benders decomposition. Management Science 20, 822–844.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Guignard, M., Spielberg, K., 1979. A direct dual method for the mixed plant location problem. Mathematical Programming 17, 198–228.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Guintini, R., Andel, T., 1995. Master the six RÕs of reverse logistics. Transportation and Distribution, 93–98.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Krarup, J., Pruzan, P.W., 1983. The simple plant location problem: Survey and synthesis. European Journal of Operational Research 12, 36–81.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Krikke, H.R., van Harten, A., Schuur, P.C., 1999a. Business case OCE: Reverse logistics network re-design for copiers. OR Spektrum 21 (3), 381–409.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Krikke, H.R., Kooi, E.J., Schuur, P.C., 1999b. Reviewing distribution issues in reverse logistics. In: Speranza, M.G., Stahly, P. (Eds.), New Trends in Distribution Logistics. Springer-Verlag, Berlin, pp. 45–62.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Kroon, L., Vrijens, G., 1995. Returnable containers: An example of reverse logistics. International Journal of Physical Distribution and logistics management 25 (2), 56–68.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Lee, C., 1993. A cross decomposition algorithm for a multiproduct-multitype facility location problem. Computers and Operations Research 20 (5), 527–540.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Louwers, D., Kip, B.J., Peters, E., Souren, F., Flapper, S.D.P., 1999. A facility location allocation model for reusing carpet materials. Computers and Industrial Engineering 36 (40), 1– 15.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Lund, R., 1984. Remanufacturing. Technology Review 87 (2), 18–23.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Min, H., 1989. A bicriterion reverse distribution model for product recall. Omega 17, 483–490.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Monczka, M., Trent, R.J., 1995. Purchasing and Sourcing Strategy: Trends and Implications. Center for Advanced Purchasing Studies, Tempe, AZ.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • Murphy, P., 1986. A preliminary study of transportation and warehousing aspects of reverse distribution. Transportation Journal 25, 12–21.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Ottoman, J., 1998. Waste not: Green strategies key to efficient products. Marketing News 32, 12–13.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Pirkul, H., Jayaraman, V., 1996.
    Google ScholarFindings
  • ReVelle, C., Laporte, G., 1996. The plant location problem: New models and research prospects. Operations Research 44, 864–874.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Rosing, K.E., ReVelle, C.S., 1997. Heuristic concentration: Two stage solution construction. European Journal of Operational Research 97, 75–86.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Rosing, K.E., ReVelle, C.S., Rolland, E., Schilling, D.A., Current, J.R., 1998. Heuristic concentration and tabu search: A head to head comparison. European Journal of Operational Research 104, 93–99.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Rousso, A., Shah, S., 1994. Packaging taxes and recycling incentives: The German green dot program. National Tax Journal XLVIII, 689–701.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Sarkis, J., Darnall, N., Nehman, G., Priest, J., 1995. The role of supply chain management within the industrial ecosystem. In: Proceedings of the 1995 IEEE International Symposium on Electronics and the Environment, Orlando, FL, pp. 229– 234.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Schuldenfrei, R., Shapiro, J., 1980. Inbound collection of goods: The reverse distribution problem. Interfaces 10, 30–33.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Smith, N.C., Thomas, R.J., Quelch, J., 1996. A strategic approach to manage product recalls. Harvard Business Review, 102–112.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Spengler, T., Puchert, H., Penkuhn, T., Rentz, O., 1997. Environmental integrated production and recycling management. European Journal of Operational Research 97, 308–326.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Sridharan, R., 1995. The capacitated plant location problem. European Journal of Operational Research 87, 203–213.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Stock, J., 1998. Development and Implementation of Reverse Logistics Programs. Council of Logistics Management, USA.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Tragantalerngsak, S., Holt, J., Ronnqvist, M., 1997. Lagrangian heuristics for the two-echelon, single-source, capacitated facility location problem. European Journal of Operational Research 102, 611–625.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
  • Thomas, D., Griffin, P., 1996. Coordinated supply chain management. European Journal of Operational Research 94, 1–15.
    Google ScholarLocate open access versionFindings
您的评分 :
0

 

标签
评论
小科