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Since formic acid can be converted to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, the latter can be used for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to GVL, making the process hydrogenindependent and readily useable even at remote parts of the world

Integration of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Catalytic Processes for a Multi-step Conversion of Biomass: From Sucrose to Levulinic Acid, γ-Valerolactone, 1,4-Pentanediol, 2-Methyl-tetrahydrofuran, and Alkanes

Topics in Catalysis, no. 1 (2008): 49-54

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摘要

The multi-step conversion of sucrose to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes was achieved by integrating various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems. We have confirmed that the dehydration of sucrose to levulinic and formic acids is currently limited to about 30–40% in the presence of H2SO4, HCl, or Nafion NR50 in water. Perform...更多

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简介
  • The utilization of renewable resources should be accelerated because of the frequently and unexpectedly changing political/economical environments resulting in limited access to and rising costs of fossil fuels [1, 2].
  • If the currently forecasted transition to hydrogen economy would materialize in the few decades [5], hydrogen would be available in large quantities at reasonable low prices for the conversion of carbohydrate-based feedstocks to a variety of industrial chemical products including oxygenates and hydrocarbons (Eq 1b) [6,7,8,9].
  • The latter could truly be considered as a ‘‘renewable oil’’ ready to be converted by existing technologies to all products used today
重点内容
  • The utilization of renewable resources should be accelerated because of the frequently and unexpectedly changing political/economical environments resulting in limited access to and rising costs of fossil fuels [1, 2]
  • Since formic acid can be decomposed to carbon dioxide and hydrogen on palladium, silver or copper [16], the latter can be used for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to GVL
  • Formic acid could be used in the transfer hydrogenation of levulinic acid to GVL as well
  • We have demonstrated the multi-step conversion of sucrose to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes by integrating various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems (Scheme 1)
  • Since formic acid can be converted to carbon dioxide and hydrogen, the latter can be used for the hydrogenation of levulinic acid to GVL, making the process hydrogenindependent and readily useable even at remote parts of the world
结果
  • Results and Discussions

    The selective dehydration of carbohydrates to levulinic and formic acids is a attractive approach for carbohydrates-based biomass conversion.
  • Using formic acid as the hydrogen source could make these processes hydrogenindependent and readily useable even at remote parts of the world.
  • It should be emphasized, that the hydrogenation catalysts should not reduce GVL to 2-Me-THF even at a few hundred ppm levels, as 2-Me-THF could readily form peroxides under air resulting in serious safety issues.
  • While this seems not to be an issue with homogeneous catalysts, such a control of a heterogeneous catalytic systems could be a challenge even today
结论
  • The authors have demonstrated the multi-step conversion of sucrose to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes by integrating various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems (Scheme 1).
  • The conversion of biomass to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes could provide a renewable platform for the chemical industry
  • The utilization of such reaction schemes could lead to a zero-sum carbon cycling, which could have a major environmental impact not to mention that after the depletion of all fossil resources in the future this type of approach is the only viable one for the production of carbon-based consumer products.
  • While sucrose was and can be used as a simple model compound for catalyst development, it should not be considered as a viable feedstock, since a sustainable biomass conversion process cannot compete with land and agricultural resources for
总结
  • Introduction:

    The utilization of renewable resources should be accelerated because of the frequently and unexpectedly changing political/economical environments resulting in limited access to and rising costs of fossil fuels [1, 2].
  • If the currently forecasted transition to hydrogen economy would materialize in the few decades [5], hydrogen would be available in large quantities at reasonable low prices for the conversion of carbohydrate-based feedstocks to a variety of industrial chemical products including oxygenates and hydrocarbons (Eq 1b) [6,7,8,9].
  • The latter could truly be considered as a ‘‘renewable oil’’ ready to be converted by existing technologies to all products used today
  • Results:

    Results and Discussions

    The selective dehydration of carbohydrates to levulinic and formic acids is a attractive approach for carbohydrates-based biomass conversion.
  • Using formic acid as the hydrogen source could make these processes hydrogenindependent and readily useable even at remote parts of the world.
  • It should be emphasized, that the hydrogenation catalysts should not reduce GVL to 2-Me-THF even at a few hundred ppm levels, as 2-Me-THF could readily form peroxides under air resulting in serious safety issues.
  • While this seems not to be an issue with homogeneous catalysts, such a control of a heterogeneous catalytic systems could be a challenge even today
  • Conclusion:

    The authors have demonstrated the multi-step conversion of sucrose to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes by integrating various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic systems (Scheme 1).
  • The conversion of biomass to various C5-oxygenates and alkanes could provide a renewable platform for the chemical industry
  • The utilization of such reaction schemes could lead to a zero-sum carbon cycling, which could have a major environmental impact not to mention that after the depletion of all fossil resources in the future this type of approach is the only viable one for the production of carbon-based consumer products.
  • While sucrose was and can be used as a simple model compound for catalyst development, it should not be considered as a viable feedstock, since a sustainable biomass conversion process cannot compete with land and agricultural resources for
基金
  • This work was funded by the Hungarian National Scientific Research Fund (T047207)
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