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We describe Gated Graph Neural Networks, our adaptation of Graph Neural Networks that is suitable for non-sequential outputs

Gated Graph Sequence Neural Networks

international conference on learning representations, (2016)

Cited by: 1853|Views158
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Abstract

Graph-structured data appears frequently in domains including chemistry, natural language semantics, social networks, and knowledge bases. In this work, we study feature learning techniques for graph-structured inputs. Our starting point is previous work on Graph Neural Networks (Scarselli et al., 2009), which we modify to use gated rec...More

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Introduction
  • Many practical applications build on graph-structured data, and the authors often want to perform machine learning tasks that take graphs as inputs.
  • More closely related to the goal in this work are methods that learn features on graphs, including Graph Neural Networks (Gori et al, 2005; Scarselli et al, 2009), spectral networks (Bruna et al, 2013) and recent work on learning graph fingerprints for classification tasks on graph representations of chemical molecules (Duvenaud et al, 2015).
  • Previous work on feature learning for graph-structured inputs has focused on models that produce single outputs such as graph-level classifications, but many problems with graph inputs require outputting sequences.
  • A secondary contribution is highlighting that Graph Neural Networks are a broadly useful class of neural network model that is applicable to many problems currently facing the field
Highlights
  • Many practical applications build on graph-structured data, and we often want to perform machine learning tasks that take graphs as inputs
  • A secondary contribution is highlighting that Graph Neural Networks are a broadly useful class of neural network model that is applicable to many problems currently facing the field
  • We describe Gated Graph Neural Networks (GG-NNs), our adaptation of Graph Neural Networks that is suitable for non-sequential outputs
  • We describe Gated Graph Sequence Neural Networks (GGS-NNs), in which several Gated Graph Neural Networks operate in sequence to produce an output sequence o(1) . . . o(K)
  • We provide baselines to show that the symbolic representation does not help RNNs or LSTMs significantly, and show that Gated Graph Sequence Neural Networks solve the problem with a small number of training instances
  • The Gated Graph Neural Networks model can be seen as learning this, with results stored in the neural network weights
Methods
  • The authors produced a dataset of 327 formulas that involves three program variables, with 498 graphs per formula, yielding around 160,000 formula/heap graph combinations.
  • The authors compared the GGS-NN-based model with a method the authors developed earlier (Brockschmidt et al, 2015).
  • The earlier approach treats each prediction step as standard classification, and requires complex, manual, problem-specific feature engineering, to achieve an accuracy of 89.11%.
  • The authors' new model was trained with no feature engineering and very little domain knowledge and achieved an accuracy of 89.96%
Results
  • The authors demonstrate the capabilities on some simple AI and graph algorithm learning tasks.
  • The bAbI Task 19 (Path Finding) is arguably the hardest task among all bAbI tasks (see e.g., (Sukhbaatar et al, 2015), which reports an accuracy of less than 20% for all methods that do not use the strong supervision)
Conclusion
  • What is being learned? It is instructive to consider what is being learned by the GG-NNs.
  • The current GGS-NNs formulation specifies a question only after all the facts have been consumed
  • This implies that the network must try to derive all consequences of the seen facts and store all pertinent information to a node within its node representation.
  • This is likely not ideal; it would be preferable to develop methods that take the question as an initial input, and dynamically derive the facts needed to answer the question.
  • The authors consider these graph neural networks as representing a step towards a model that can combine structured representations with the powerful algorithms of deep learning, with the aim of taking advantage of known structure while learning and inferring how to reason with and extend these representations
Tables
  • Table1: Accuracy in percentage of different models for different tasks. Number in parentheses is number of training examples required to reach shown accuracy
  • Table2: Performance breakdown of RNN and LSTM on bAbI task 4 as the amount of training data changes
  • Table3: Accuracy in percentage of different models for different tasks. The number in parentheses is number of training examples required to reach that level of accuracy
  • Table4: Example list manipulation programs and the separation logic formula invariants the GGSNN model founds from a set of input graphs. The “=” parts are produced by a deterministic procedure that goes through all the named program variables in all graphs and checks for inequality
Download tables as Excel
Related work
  • The most closely related work is GNNs, which we have discussed at length above. Micheli (2009) proposed another closely related model that differs from GNNs mainly in the output model. GNNs have been applied in several domains (Gori et al, 2005; Di Massa et al, 2006; Scarselli et al, 2009; Uwents et al, 2011), but they do not appear to be in widespread use in the ICLR community. Part of our aim here is to publicize GNNs as a useful and interesting neural network variant. An analogy can be drawn between our adaptation from GNNs to GG-NNs, to the work of Domke (2011) and Stoyanov et al (2011) in the structured prediction setting. There belief propagation (which must be run to near convergence to get good gradients) is replaced with truncated belief propagation updates, and then the model is trained so that the truncated iteration produce good results after a fixed number of iterations. Similarly, Recursive Neural Networks (Goller & Kuchler, 1996; Socher et al, 2011) being extended to Tree LSTMs (Tai et al, 2015) is analogous to our using of GRU updates in GG-NNs instead of the standard GNN recurrence with the aim of improving the long-term propagation of information across a graph structure.
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