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In this paper we have presented our experience from using the blockchain in several projects

The Blockchain as a Software Connector.

WICSA, pp.182-191, (2016)

Cited by: 314|Views30
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Abstract

Blockchain is an emerging technology for decentralized and transactional data sharing across a large network of untrusted participants. It enables new forms of distributed software architectures, where components can find agreements on their shared states without trusting a central integration point or any particular participating compone...More

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Introduction
  • Blockchain is an emerging technology that enables new forms of distributed software architectures, where components can find agreements on their shared states for decentralized and transactional data sharing across a large network of untrusted participants without relying on a central integration point that should be trusted by every component within the system .

    The blockchain data structure is a timestamped list of blocks, which records and aggregates data about transactions that have ever occurred within the blockchain network.
  • The whole network reaches a consensus before a transaction is included into the immutable data storage.
  • Cryptocurrencies are low-cost and inherently independent of any centralized authority to transfer virtual money or issue new units of money.
  • New units of money are issued by the users of the cryptocurrency through mining.
  • The virtual money can be transferred among peer-to-peer users without going through a trusted authority to purchase goods and services in real world.
Highlights
  • Blockchain is an emerging technology that enables new forms of distributed software architectures, where components can find agreements on their shared states for decentralized and transactional data sharing across a large network of untrusted participants without relying on a central integration point that should be trusted by every component within the system .

    The blockchain data structure is a timestamped list of blocks, which records and aggregates data about transactions that have ever occurred within the blockchain network
  • From an architectural perspective, according to the taxonomy of software connectors [16], we propose to consider the blockchain as a novel kind of software connector, which should be considered as a possible decentralized alternative to existing centralized shared date storage
  • We found that using the blockchain as a software connector could improve information transparency and traceability
  • We conducted a small experiment to test the performance of a private blockchain, and compared the result with the public blockchain
  • In this paper we have presented our experience from using the blockchain in several projects
Conclusion
  • Lesson: scalability and performance The performance of public blockchain is very limited.
  • Public blockchains can only process 3-20 transactions per second.
  • The authors conducted a small experiment to test the performance of a private blockchain, and compared the result with the public blockchain.
  • The number of transactions included into one block was around 15000 transaction on average, and the mining time was around 41 second on average.
  • The transaction process rate was around 366 transactions per second.In this paper the authors have presented the experience from using the blockchain in several projects.
  • Based on the practical project experience the authors have distilled important design decisions implied by the choice of introducing a blockchain in the architecture and discussed the corresponding trade-offs
Summary
  • Introduction:

    Blockchain is an emerging technology that enables new forms of distributed software architectures, where components can find agreements on their shared states for decentralized and transactional data sharing across a large network of untrusted participants without relying on a central integration point that should be trusted by every component within the system .

    The blockchain data structure is a timestamped list of blocks, which records and aggregates data about transactions that have ever occurred within the blockchain network.
  • The whole network reaches a consensus before a transaction is included into the immutable data storage.
  • Cryptocurrencies are low-cost and inherently independent of any centralized authority to transfer virtual money or issue new units of money.
  • New units of money are issued by the users of the cryptocurrency through mining.
  • The virtual money can be transferred among peer-to-peer users without going through a trusted authority to purchase goods and services in real world.
  • Conclusion:

    Lesson: scalability and performance The performance of public blockchain is very limited.
  • Public blockchains can only process 3-20 transactions per second.
  • The authors conducted a small experiment to test the performance of a private blockchain, and compared the result with the public blockchain.
  • The number of transactions included into one block was around 15000 transaction on average, and the mining time was around 41 second on average.
  • The transaction process rate was around 366 transactions per second.In this paper the authors have presented the experience from using the blockchain in several projects.
  • Based on the practical project experience the authors have distilled important design decisions implied by the choice of introducing a blockchain in the architecture and discussed the corresponding trade-offs
Tables
  • Table1: Examples of blockchain applications and platforms their peers untill the transaction reaches every node in the network
  • Table2: Design decisions and quality attribute trade-offs
Download tables as Excel
Funding
  • NICTA is funded by the Australian Government through the Department of Communications and the Australian Research Council through the ICT Centre of Excellence Program
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