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We propose and formulate a novel concept of neuron merging that compensates for the accuracy loss of the pruned neurons

Neuron Merging: Compensating for Pruned Neurons

NIPS 2020, (2020)

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Abstract

Network pruning is widely used to lighten and accelerate neural network models. Structured network pruning discards the whole neuron or filter, leading to accuracy loss. In this work, we propose a novel concept of neuron merging applicable to both fully connected layers and convolution layers, which compensates for the information loss ...More

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Introduction
  • Modern Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) models have shown outstanding performance in many computer vision tasks.
  • Due to their numerous parameters and computation, it remains challenging to deploy them to mobile phones or edge devices.
  • The most prevalent structured pruning method for CNN models is to prune filters of each convolution layer and the corresponding output feature map channels.
  • The filter or channel to be removed is determined by various saliency criteria [15, 26, 27]
Highlights
  • Modern Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) models have shown outstanding performance in many computer vision tasks
  • Unstructured pruning produces sparse weight matrices, which cannot lead to actual speedup and compression without specialized hardware or libraries [3]
  • Since structured pruning maintains the original weight structure, no specialized hardware or libraries are necessary for acceleration
  • Our contributions are as follows: (1) We propose and formulate a novel concept of neuron merging that compensates for the information loss due to the pruned neurons/filters in both fully connected layers and convolution layers
  • (3) We show that our merged model better preserves the original model than the pruned model with various measures, such as the accuracy immediately after pruning, feature map visualization, and Weighted Average Reconstruction Error [27]
  • For VGG-16 on CIFAR-10, we achieve an accuracy of 93.16% while reducing 64% of total parameters, without any fine-tuning
  • We propose and formulate a novel concept of neuron merging that compensates for the accuracy loss of the pruned neurons
Methods
  • The authors mathematically formulate the new concept of neuron merging in the fully connected layer.
  • The authors show how merging is applied to the convolution layer.
  • The authors start with the fully connected layer without bias.
  • Let Ni denote the length of input column vector for the i-th fully connected layer.
  • The i-th fully connected layer transforms the input vector xi ∈ RNi into the output vector xi+1 ∈ RNi+1.
  • The network weights of the i-th layer are denoted as Wi ∈ RNi×Ni+1
Results
  • Image Classification Results on ImageNet

    In Table 4, the authors present the test results of VGG-16 and ResNet-34 on ImageNet.
  • Image Classification Results on ImageNet.
  • In Table 4, the authors present the test results of VGG-16 and ResNet-34 on ImageNet. The authors prune only the last convolution layer of VGG-16 as most of the parameters come from fully connected layers.
  • Due to the large scale of the dataset, the initial accuracy right after the pruning drops rapidly as the pruning ratio increases.
  • The authors' merging recovers the accuracy in all cases, showing the idea is effective even for large-scale datasets like ImageNet. VGG-16
Conclusion
  • The authors propose and formulate a novel concept of neuron merging that compensates for the accuracy loss of the pruned neurons.
  • The authors' one-shot and data-free method better reconstructs the output feature maps of the original model than vanilla pruning.
  • To demonstrate the effectiveness of merging over network pruning, the authors compare the initial accuracy, WARE, and feature map visualization on image-classification tasks.
  • It is worth noting that decomposing the weights can be varied in the neuron merging formulation.
  • The authors plan to generalize the neuron merging formulation to more diverse activation functions and model architectures
Summary
  • Introduction:

    Modern Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) models have shown outstanding performance in many computer vision tasks.
  • Due to their numerous parameters and computation, it remains challenging to deploy them to mobile phones or edge devices.
  • The most prevalent structured pruning method for CNN models is to prune filters of each convolution layer and the corresponding output feature map channels.
  • The filter or channel to be removed is determined by various saliency criteria [15, 26, 27]
  • Objectives:

    The authors' goal is to maintain the activation feature map of the (i + 1)-th layer, which is
  • Methods:

    The authors mathematically formulate the new concept of neuron merging in the fully connected layer.
  • The authors show how merging is applied to the convolution layer.
  • The authors start with the fully connected layer without bias.
  • Let Ni denote the length of input column vector for the i-th fully connected layer.
  • The i-th fully connected layer transforms the input vector xi ∈ RNi into the output vector xi+1 ∈ RNi+1.
  • The network weights of the i-th layer are denoted as Wi ∈ RNi×Ni+1
  • Results:

    Image Classification Results on ImageNet

    In Table 4, the authors present the test results of VGG-16 and ResNet-34 on ImageNet.
  • Image Classification Results on ImageNet.
  • In Table 4, the authors present the test results of VGG-16 and ResNet-34 on ImageNet. The authors prune only the last convolution layer of VGG-16 as most of the parameters come from fully connected layers.
  • Due to the large scale of the dataset, the initial accuracy right after the pruning drops rapidly as the pruning ratio increases.
  • The authors' merging recovers the accuracy in all cases, showing the idea is effective even for large-scale datasets like ImageNet. VGG-16
  • Conclusion:

    The authors propose and formulate a novel concept of neuron merging that compensates for the accuracy loss of the pruned neurons.
  • The authors' one-shot and data-free method better reconstructs the output feature maps of the original model than vanilla pruning.
  • To demonstrate the effectiveness of merging over network pruning, the authors compare the initial accuracy, WARE, and feature map visualization on image-classification tasks.
  • It is worth noting that decomposing the weights can be varied in the neuron merging formulation.
  • The authors plan to generalize the neuron merging formulation to more diverse activation functions and model architectures
Tables
  • Table1: Performance comparison of pruning and merging for LeNet-300-100 on FashionMNIST without fine-tuning. ‘Acc.↑’ denotes the accuracy gain of merging compared to pruning
  • Table2: Performance comparison of pruning and merging for VGG-16 on CIFAR datasets without fine-tuning. ‘M-P’ denotes the accuracy recovery of merging compared to pruning. ‘B-M’ denotes the accuracy drop of the merged model compared to the baseline model. ‘Param. ↓ (#)’ denotes the parameter reduction rate and the absolute number of pruned/merged models
  • Table3: WARE comparison of pruning and merging for various models on CIFAR-10. ‘WARE ↓’ denotes the WARE drop of the merged model compared to the pruned model
  • Table4: Performance comparison of pruning and merging for VGG-16 and ResNet-34 on ImageNet dataset without fine-tuning. ‘Param. #’ denotes absolute parameter number of pruned/merged models. For VGG, ‘Last-{}%’ denotes the pruning ratio of the last convolution layer
Download tables as Excel
Related work
  • A variety of criteria [5, 6, 15, 18, 26, 27] have been proposed to evaluate the importance of a neuron, in the case of CNN, a filter. However, all of them suffer from significant accuracy drop immediately after the pruning. Therefore, fine-tuning the pruned model often requires as many epochs as training the original model to restore the accuracy near the original model. Several works [16, 25] add trainable parameters to each feature map channel to obtain data-driven channel sparsity, enabling the model to automatically identify redundant filters. In this case, training the model from scratch is inevitable to obtain the channel sparsity, which is a time- and resource-consuming process.

    Among filter pruning works, Luo et al [17] and He et al [7] have similar motivation to ours, aiming to similarly reconstruct the output feature map of the next layer. Luo et al [17] search the subset of filters that have the smallest effect on the output feature map of the next layer. He et al [7] propose LASSO regression based channel selection and least square reconstruction of output feature maps. In both papers, data samples are required to obtain feature maps. However, our method is novel in that it compensates for the loss of removed filters in a one-shot and data-free way.
Funding
  • Acknowledgments and Disclosure of Funding This research was results of a study on the “HPC Support” Project, supported by the ‘Ministry of Science and ICT’ and NIPA
  • This work was also supported by Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) under the project “HERO Part 1: Development of core technology of ambient intelligence for proactive service in digital in-home care.”
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Author
Woojeong Kim
Woojeong Kim
Mincheol Park
Mincheol Park
Geunseok Jeon
Geunseok Jeon
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