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Darwiche and Hirth use variations of the notion of sufficient reason to explore the interpretability of Ordered BDDs

Model Interpretability through the lens of Computational Complexity

NIPS 2020, (2020)

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摘要

In spite of several claims stating that some models are more interpretable than others -- e.g., "linear models are more interpretable than deep neural networks" -- we still lack a principled notion of interpretability to formally compare among different classes of models. We make a step towards such a notion by studying whether folklore...更多

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简介
  • Assume a dystopian future in which the increasing number of submissions has forced journal editors to use machine-learning systems for automatically accepting or rejecting papers.
  • The authors formalize the framework described above (Section 2) and use it to perform a theoretical study of the computational complexity of three important types of explainability queries over three classes of models.
重点内容
  • Assume a dystopian future in which the increasing number of submissions has forced journal editors to use machine-learning systems for automatically accepting or rejecting papers
  • Under standard complexity assumptions, the computational problems associated to our interpretability queries are strictly less complex for free binary decision diagrams (FBDDs) than they are for multilayer perceptrons (MLPs)
  • We show that for FBDDs, the queries minimum-change-required and counting-completions can be solved in polynomial time, while for MLPs these queries are, respectively, nondeterministic polynomial time (NP)-complete and #P-complete
  • The need for model interpretability in machine learning has been heavily advocated during the last few years, with works covering theoretical and practical issues [3, 19, 23, 26, 27]
  • Darwiche and Hirth [8] use variations of the notion of sufficient reason to explore the interpretability of Ordered BDDs (OBDDs)
  • The FBDDs that we consider in our work generalize OBDDs, and our results for sufficient reasons over FBDDs can be seen as generalizations of the results in [8]
结果
  • The authors instantiate the framework on three important classes of Boolean models and explainability queries, and present the main theorems comparing such models in terms of c-interpretability.
  • The authors prove these results where for each query Q and class of models C the authors pinpoint the exact complexity of the problem Q(C).
  • Comparing perceptrons and MLPs. the query COUNTCOMPLETIONS is #P-complete for perceptrons, the authors can still show that the complexity goes down to PTIME if the authors assume the weights and biases to be integers given in unary; this is commonly called pseudo-polynomial time.
  • This result establishes a difference between perceptrons and MLPs in terms of CC, as this query remains #P-complete for the latter even if weights and biases are given as integers in unary.
  • Another difference is established by the fact that COUNTCOMPLETIONS for perceptrons can be efficiently approximated, while this is not the case for MLPs. To present this idea, the authors briefly recall the notion of fully polynomial randomized approximation scheme (FPRAS [21]), which is heavily used to refine the analysis of the complexity of #P-hard problems.
  • 5 Parameterized results for MLPs in terms of number of layers In Section 4.1 the authors proved that the query MINIMUMCHANGEREQUIRED is NP-complete for MLPs. a careful inspection of the proof reveals that MCR is already NP-hard for MLPs with only a few layers.
  • This is not something specific to MCR: all lower bounds for the queries studied in the paper in terms of MLPs hold for a small, fixed number of layers.
  • One of them is the use of a more sophisticated complexity analysis that is not so much focused on the worst case complexity study propose here, but on identifying relevant parameters that characterize more precisely how difficult it is to interpret a particular class of models in practice.
结论
  • In order to avoid the difficulties of defining a general notion of interpretability [23], the authors have used explainability queries and their complexity as a formal proxy.
  • Even though the notion of complexity-based interpretability gives a precise way to compare models, the results show that it is still dependent on the particular set of queries that one picks.
表格
  • Table1: Summary of our complexity results
Download tables as Excel
基金
  • Acknowledgments and Disclosure of Funding Barceló and Pérez are funded by Fondecyt grant 1200967
研究对象与分析
papers: 20
3. We only accept 1 out of 20 papers that do not cite any other paper from our own journal. In order to increase your chances next time, please add more references

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  • 1. Create nodes v1,..., vn, where node vi is labeled with φi The node vn will be the root of T, and for 2 ≤ i ≤ n, connect vi to vi−1 with an edge labeled with 1. Node v1 is connected to a leaf labeled true through an edge labeled with 1. We will denote the path created in this step as π.
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  • 2. For every vertex φi create a decision tree Ti equivalent to the boolean formula
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  • 2. Add a new output gate that is a binary majority between the old output gate and the node u.
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  • 3. Replace every small sub-circuit S by its equivalent monotone DNF formula, consisting of one large OR-gate and many large AND-gates.
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  • 4. Relabel every large OR-gate, of fan-in ≤ 23d created in the previous step to be a majority gate with the same inputs, but to which one wires as well parallel edges from the input node u.
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  • 5. Relabel every large AND-gate g, of fan-in ≤ 3d, to be a majority gate. If g had edges from gates g1,..., g, then replace each edge coming from a gi by k + 1 parallel edges, and finally, wire (k + 1) − 1 nodes in N to g.
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  • 2. Add an extra input, that we call v1, to MC. This means that if MC had dimension n, then MC has dimension n + 1. 8Please excuse us for using left superscripts.
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  • 3. Create nodes v2,..., vt, all having a bias of 0, and for each 1 ≤ i < t, connect node vi to node vi+1 with an edge of weight 1.
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  • 4. Let r be the root of MC, and let m be its fan-in. We connect node vt to r with an edge of weight m. Moreover, if the bias of r in MC was b, we set it to be b − m in MC.
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  • 5. Observe that MC is layerized. To make it a valid MLP (where all the neurons of a layer are connected to all the neurons of the adjacent layers), we do as in the proof of Lemma 13 by adding dummy null weights.
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  • 2. The instance 0n+1 is negative for MC
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  • 1. Add a new layer with n + 1 input nodes x1,..., xn+1, below what previously was the layer of 2n input nodes x1,..., xn, x1,..., xn.
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  • 2. For every 1 ≤ i ≤ n, connect input node xi with its corresponding node xi in the second layer, making xi a unary majority, with the same outgoing edges it had as an input node. This enforces xi = xi.
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  • 3. Create a new root r for the circuit, and let r be a binary majority between the input node xn+1 and the previous root r.
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  • 4. Replace each previous input node xi by a majority gates mi that has n + 1 − 2k incoming edges from xn+1, and one incoming edge from each xj with j ∈ {i, n + 1}. The outgoing edges are preserved.
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作者
Mikaël Monet
Mikaël Monet
Bernardo Subercaseaux
Bernardo Subercaseaux
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